CIC is not Accredited says OSHA

This is the reason I support NCCCO. We at Crews Crane Training International, Inc. are certified mobile crane operators and provide the training to get employees certified through NCCCO.

Read below what has been said by OSHA. CIC is not recognized by OSHA as accredited.

OSHA warning re CIC certification

The US Department of Labor/ OSHA has issued a notice stating that it no longer recognises crane operator test certifications issued by Florida based Crane Institute Certification – CIC.

The statement issued on Monday states: “OSHA will not accept CIC certification (including recertification) issued on or after December 2, 2019, as evidence of compliance with OSHA’s operator certification requirements in 29 CFR 1926.1427.”

The reason behind the agency’s announcement is that CIC has confirmed that it has no current accreditation to test and certify operators to OSHA’s standards and requirements. CIC has stated though, that it hopes to obtain the required accreditation sometime over the next few months.

On the basis that CIC was previously accredited, OSHA has made it clear that it understands that some employers will have obtained operator certification through CIC in good faith. In such cases where this is found to be the case it will not cite the employer for violating the operator certification requirement. Also that such operator certifications can run their course. BUT it will not accept any such certifications issued after December 2nd of this year, regardless of any claims of good faith.

CIC which was established in 2007 has yet to issue a statement on this development.

The full text of the announcement from Scott Ketcham, a director from the Directorate of Construction is as follows :

SUBJECT: Temporary Enforcement Policy- Certification Issued by Crane Institute Certification

Background

Subpart CC—Cranes and Derricks in Construction requires crane operators to be certified by a certification body “accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency.” 29 CFR 1926.1427(d). The Crane Institute Certification (CIC) had previously been accredited by an organization that appeared to meet that requirement. However, CIC has informed OSHA it is not currently accredited by a nationally recognized accrediting agency. CIC also stated that it expects to receive that accreditation within the next few months. Therefore, operator certifications currently being issued by CIC do not meet the requirements of OSHA’s standard.
Nevertheless, OSHA understands that CIC was previously accredited, and even after its accreditation lapsed, many employers may have acted in good faith by obtaining crane operator certifications from CIC that they believed would comply with OSHA’s requirements. The agency wishes to avoid unnecessary disruptions in the industry.

Temporary Enforcement Citation Policy

To eliminate construction industry confusion going forward, OSHA will consider whether crane operators acting in good faith obtained certifications issued by CIC prior to December 2, 2019 believing they met the requirements of the standard. Where such good faith is found, employers should not be cited for violating the operator certification requirement of 29 CFR 1926.1427(d). This policy will only apply until the expiration date listed on each certificate (that date cannot exceed the 5-year maximum specified in 29 CFR 1926.1427(d)(4)).
OSHA will not accept CIC certification (including recertification) issued on or after December 2, 2019, as evidence of compliance with OSHA’s operator certification requirements in 29 CFR 1926.1427. Please contact the Directorate of Construction if there are any questions during compliance inspections about the validity of crane operator certifications issued by CIC. OSHA intends to revisit this policy when CIC produces evidence that it is accredited in accordance with the requirements found in 29 CFR 1926.1427(d).

Posted in ANSI, ASME, Crane Training, Mobile Crane, NCCCO, OSHA, Safety, Training | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Carry Deck Mobile Crane Training

Congratulations to all the employees who attended the Carry Deck Mobile Crane Training. Many of the students comments as they completed the training were “they did not realized how much you had to know to be a crane operator.”

Mobile Crane Training requires a student to not only know how to push and pull levers but to also do some of the following:

  • Inspect the entire crane each day and prior to lifting
  • Calculate the load being lifted to know the weights
  • Ensure the rigging and hardware that is to be used is inspected and the correct load capacity based on angle, center of gravity and reduction factors
  • How to set up the crane properly to ensure clearance from objects and power lines
  • Proper signaling

Just a few of the things that are required each and every time your to operate the crane.

Weather is changing in Augusta, GA and it made for a great week and lots of laughter among all the students as they practiced moving a load with water around the obstacles. Learning how to operate the crab steering of the crane to enable the students to get into very tight areas of the mill.

Thanks again to all who participated and received their Mobile Crane Carry Deck Qualification

For more information contact Joe at CCTI for training opportunities

2019-11-21 12.35.502019-11-21 12.36.132019-11-21 12.36.342019-11-21 12.36.392019-11-21 12.43.552019-11-21 13.09.502019-11-21 13.31.002019-11-21 14.22.162019-11-21 14.22.31

Posted in Crane Inspection, Crane Training, Driving, Mobile Crane, NCCCO, OSHA, Rigging, Safety, Training | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Rigging Level 1 & 2 plus signaler

Do you know how to rig I asked? Sure I been doing this for 20+ years he says!        Another says yeap, been rigging for 30 years and I got this!!!                                             Well, those words started to change as we delved into our first few lessons on rigging.

“Did not know that he says”, Never done it like that he says, Not how I was taught he says, and on and on and on for 3 days as we studied deeper into Rigging Level 1 & 2.

I met 15 employees this week that work all over the east coast, that are preparing for their NCCCO rigging level 1 & 2 certification. Preparing them all for testing both written and practical was an interesting 3 days.

Tying the 5 knots required by a rigger, calculating sling stress, sling angles, reduction factors, finding center of gravity, using known weights, known runs, calculating what an object weighed by using (L x W x H, or circumference, angles, tubing dimensions) were all a part of being a rigger became much more challenging.

We had many laughs, uh huh moments, didn’t know that comments, I have been doing that wrong for all of my career conversations. It made for a very interesting time with these 15 employees of a construction/service company branched out of Charlotte, North Carolina. Then came the test day which made for some interesting discoveries. Not quite ready for the NCCCO test is what was revealed. May need to go home and study for about 60 days before taking the NCCCO test for Rigging Level 1 & 2.                                              That is why we provide rigging training; (to enable proper procedure and knowledge to prevent bad habits, correct bad habits and overall just learning how to rig a load properly).

I wasn’t sure what I was walking into on day 1 with such an experienced group of mechanics, plumbers, electricians, welders by trade. But one thing for sure, we laughed a lot, learned a lot and as they left on Wednesday this week, they all became more aware of what a seasoned rigger really knew when it came to saying “Hoist that load”.

Thanks to all involved that made our 3 days together a great experience. Look forward to the next time we meet.

Below are some pictures of the hard workers at MSS Supply headquartered in Charlotte, North Carolina. Remember to “Look up and Live”.

If your in need of rigging training, been rigging for 20 years or need to refresh your skills, give us a shout at Crews Crane Training International, Inc.       joe@cranetraininginternational.com    336.337.1043

 

2019-11-12 13.28.212019-11-12 13.28.35-12019-11-12 13.28.41-12019-11-12 13.30.562019-11-12 13.31.562019-11-12 13.33.002019-11-12 13.33.102019-11-12 13.33.182019-11-12 13.33.33-12019-11-12 13.33.362019-11-12 13.39.362019-11-12 13.44.082019-11-12 13.45.502019-11-12 13.47.59-12019-11-12 13.48.03-12019-11-12 13.48.09-12019-11-12 13.48.122019-11-12 13.48.29-12019-11-12 13.48.39-12019-11-12 13.48.41-12019-11-12 14.51.502019-11-12 14.52.362019-11-12 14.52.57-12019-11-12 14.55.262019-11-12 14.59.022019-11-12 15.07.57-12019-11-12 15.08.03-12019-11-12 15.08.142019-11-12 15.08.19-12019-11-12 15.08.43-1

Posted in Training | Leave a comment

Wire rope sling not too good

How much can a sling take before it yields, breaks and eventually drops the load?

No one really knows until it happens.

Inspect your slings, use them correctly and most of all do not overload them to failure.

Picture of a sling and hook a customer where things happened.

Eye hook snappedWire rope sling cut

Posted in Crane Training, Mobile Crane, Near Miss, Rigging, Safety, Sling, Training | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments

The Most Frequently Cited Standards 2019

The Most Frequently Cited Standards 2019:

Fall Protection – General Requirements (501): 6,010 violations
Hazard Communication (1200): 3,671
Scaffolding (451): 2,813
Lockout/Tagout (147): 2,606
Respiratory Protection (134): 2,450
Ladders (1053): 2,345
Powered Industrial Trucks (178): 2,093
Fall Protection – Training Requirements (503): 1,773
Machine Guarding (212): 1,743
Personal Protective/Lifesaving Equipment – Eye and Face Protection (102): 1,411
San Diego — For the ninth consecutive year, Fall Protection – General Requirements is OSHA’s most frequently cited standard, the agency and Safety+Health announced Tuesday at the National Safety Council 2019 Congress & Expo.

The rest of the preliminary list of OSHA’s Top 10 violations for fiscal year 2019 also remained largely unchanged from FY 2018, with only one minor adjustment. Lockout/Tagout, which ranked fifth in FY 2018, climbed one spot to No. 4, trading places with Respiratory Protection.

Posted in Training | Leave a comment

Top 10 OSHA Most Frequent Violations

The Most Frequently Cited Standards 2019:

  1. Fall Protection – General Requirements (501): 6,010 violations
  2. Hazard Communication (1200): 3,671
  3. Scaffolding (451): 2,813
  4. Lockout/Tagout (147): 2,606
  5. Respiratory Protection (134): 2,450
  6. Ladders (1053): 2,345
  7. Powered Industrial Trucks (178): 2,093
  8. Fall Protection – Training Requirements (503): 1,773
  9. Machine Guarding (212): 1,743
  10. Personal Protective/Lifesaving Equipment – Eye and Face Protection (102): 1,411

San Diego — For the ninth consecutive year, Fall Protection – General Requirements is OSHA’s most frequently cited standard, the agency and Safety+Health announced Tuesday at the National Safety Council 2019 Congress & Expo.

The rest of the preliminary list of OSHA’s Top 10 violations for fiscal year 2019 also remained largely unchanged from FY 2018, with only one minor adjustment. Lockout/Tagout, which ranked fifth in FY 2018, climbed one spot to No. 4, trading places with Respiratory Protection.

Posted in Bureau of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics, Confined Space Standard, Congress, Construction, Crane Training, Customer, Days away from work, Electric Shock, Employees, Employers, Fall Protection, Fines, General Electrical Requirements, Hazard Communication, Inspection, Ladders, Lockout/Tagout, Machine Guarding, Near Miss, OSHA, Personal Protective Equipment, Power Industrial Trucks, Respiratory Protection, Safety, Scaffolding, Training, Violations | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

NCCCO Restructure Policy

The National Commission for the Certification of Crane Operators (NCCCO) is announcing the following:

1-Written Exam Retake Policy. NCCCO will be implementing an Exam Retake Policy effective October 1, 2019. This policy will require any candidate failing an NCCCO written exam to wait a minimum of four weeks before being eligible to retake the same exam again. This policy will ensure greater fairness in testing amongst all NCCCO candidates as it prevents candidates who are retesting from having an unfair advantage on a written exam due to content familiarity. NCCCO is actively developing alternate forms of all written exams to allow individuals to retest more quickly in the future. This policy change only affects those individuals who have failed a written exam and are looking to retake the exam within a four-week period. Note: There is no impact on practical testing whatsoever. Please see the Retake Policy FAQs for additional information.

2-Candidate Exam Fee Restructure. Over the years, NCCCO’s candidate exam fee schedule has become extremely complex and contains numerous inconsistencies. This has resulted in a large number of applications not being completed correctly which has created unanticipated fees and charges to candidates. The fee structure has led to confusion and frustration for candidates, employers, training companies and NCCCO. The NCCCO Board of Directors mandated that the fee structure be simplified. NCCCO created a revised candidate fee structure and presented it to the various committees and governance levels within NCCCO. This revised candidate fee structure will go into effect on January 1, 2020. We wanted to assure that you were made aware of these changes in a timely manner. Please see Candidate Fee Restructure FAQs and 2020 Candidate Fees Table for additional information.  

If you have questions, concerns and need the training to get you ready for the NCCCO Certification examinations, contact us at:

CCTI, Inc.    http://www.cranetraininginternational.com      (336) 337-1043

Posted in Crane Training, Mobile Crane, NCCCO, OSHA, Safety, Training | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment